Cleavers Galium aparine


Galium aparine
Common Names
Cleavers , Clivers, Goose Grass, Catchweed, Sweet Woodruff
Botanical Name
Galium aparine
Family
RUBIACEAE

Medicinal Uses & Benefits of Cleavers

remedyHow to Use| Side Effects | Plant & Garden|

How to Use: Cleavers



Cleavers has been used to treat
urinary infections in cats(FLUTD)

Herbalists have long regarded cleavers as a valuable lymphatic tonic and diuretic. The lymph system is the body's mechanism to wash tissues of toxins, passing them back into the bloodstream to be cleansed by the liver and kidneys. This cleansing action makes cleavers useful in treating conditions like psoriasis and arthritis, which benefit from purifying the blood. Cleavers is a reliable diuretic used to help clean gravel and urinary stones and to treat urinary infections. 1In cats, these actions make cleavers a safe long-term aid in the treatment of feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD), and the herb may also be useful for chronic low-grade kidney inflammation.2 In studies cleavers extract lowered blood pressure without slowing heart rate or having any health-threatening side effects. 3,4

Cleavers is a coffee relative, and the roasted seeds are used as a coffee substitute. The young leaves can be eaten like spinach.

Preparation Methods & Dosage :Herbal tea or 1/2 teaspoon of a liquid extract three times a day

Cleavers Remedies


  • Cleavers tea
    Cleavers main use is to as a mild diuretic. Amber colored tea with a mild, slightly woody taste. 2 to 4 grams of the dried herb in a cup of boiling water. Combines well with alfalfa and oat straw. Use cleavers tea as a bath additive or skin wash to treat skin damage from sunburn, rashes and cuts. It makes a good hair rinse for dandruff and dry scalp.


Cleavers Side Effects: Cleavers is considered a safe herb

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Plant Description


The bristle-covered fruit will latch onto (cleave)animals who brush by, hence one of its names, catchweed. Geese love it, so the name goosegrass. Native to North America and found in all the lower 48 states and Alaska.

Regional Traditions :North America *


References:
books citedWorks Cited
  1. Mabey, Richard. "The New Age Herbalist",(1988)
  2. Tillford, Gregory. "Herbs for Pets", 2001, BowTie Press
  3. Duke, James A., Green Pharmacy Herbal Handbook(2000)
  4. Mountain Rose Herbs