Oak Quercus robur

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Quercus robur
acorns in the sum
Common Names
Oak Bark , White Oak
Botanical Name
Quercus robur
Syn. Q. petraea , Quercus alba
Family
FAGACEAE

Medicinal Uses & Benefits of Oak Bark

remedyHow to Use| Side Effects | Plant & Garden| Folklore

How to Use: Oak


The mighty oak tree looms large in both mythology and herbal medicine and has been part of the plant pharmacopoeia for thousands of years. Oak bark is a powerful astringent treatment for throat and mouth infections, bleeding gums, and to cure acute diarrhea. Oak bark is a styptic, one of the herbs used to slow bleeding in cuts and wounds. Oak bark tinctures and extracts have been studied for use in kidney infections and kidney stones. 2 Using oak bark externally as an alcohol tincture or cream helps fight staph infections. Use it in a cold compress to treat burns and cuts. 3

Preparation Methods & Dosage : Oak bark can be brewed into a strong, astringent decoction that can be taken as a tea, or used in baths, douches and skin washes. Use it in a cold compress for burns and cuts, and incorporate oak bark extracts and tinctures into ointments. Oak bark powder is used in tooth and gum powders.


Oak Side Effects: Avoid taking oak bark at the same time as prescription meds.

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Plant Description

There are several hundred species of trees that have the common name oak. The genus Quercus is (from the latin "oak tree") is native to the northern hemisphere, and includes deciduous trees and evergreens, or "live oaks". 1

Related Species Quercus alba




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References:
books citedWorks Cited
  1. Wikipedia
  2. Mabey, Richard. "The New Age Herbalist",(1988)
  3. Mountain Rose Herbs
  4. Ernst and Johanna Lehner. "Folklore and Symbolism of Flowers, Plants and Trees" (2003)