Yellow Dock Rumex crispus


Rumex crispus
Curly Dock -Rumex crispus
Common Names
Yellow Dock , Sorrel, curled or narrow dock
Botanical Name
Rumex crispus
Family
POLYGONACEAE

Medicinal Uses & Benefits of Yellow Dock

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How to Use: Yellow Dock


Yellow dock as been known as a medicinal plant since ancient times and is used in traditional medicine as a gentle laxative or mild astringent tonic. It encourages both bowel movement and good digestion by stimulating the release of gastric juices. An ointment of yellow dock is valuable for eruptive skin conditions that cause itching, sores, and scabby skin lesions.

Preparation Methods & Dosage :In TCM, dock root is not boiled, as most roots are. Instead the chopped root is placed in a cup, and boiling water is poured over the roots. Cover and let steep for 30 min. Strain, reheat and drink. Dosing is dependent on the individuals needs.

Yellow Dock Remedies



See Also :Turkey Rhubarb *


In the Kitchen: The early green leaves of dock may be steamed and serves as a green. They have a pleasant lemony flavor, seasoned with garlic and olive oil. Dock leaves are rich in Vitamins A and C and contain more carotene than carrots.
Traditional Chinese Medicine traditional Chinese medicine In China yellow dock, Rumex crispus is called Chin-Choa-Mai. A tea made from the root is famous in Chinese medicine as a treatment for chronic constipation.

Yellow Dock Side Effects: The young leaves can be consumed in moderation,and should be boiled in several changes of water to remove as much of the oxalic acid in the leaves as possible. Yellow dock is a kinder, gentler laxative than rhubarb, but use only the smallest amount possible and step up dose carefully to avoid cramping. Don't use yellow dock, or any herbal laxatives in combination with Laxix (furosemide), to avoid potassium depletion. Safety during pregnancy has not been established.1

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References:
books citedWorks Cited
  1. Mountain Rose Herbs
  2. Grieve, Maud Mrs. "A Modern Herbal" (1931)
  3. Erichsen-Brown, Charlotte. Medicinal Uses of North American Plants(1979)